If you’re looking to cool your home with air conditioning, it’s important that you know the lingo. This glossary will help homeowners understand the terminology of central A/C systems and what they need to know when purchasing or installing an air conditioner. In this glossary, we’ll define the most common air conditioning terms.

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Split System

A split system is the most common type of air conditioning unit. It consists of two parts: an outdoor compressor/condenser and an indoor evaporator coil. Split systems are best for homes with existing ductwork. Also, split systems are typically more efficient than other cooling types because the evaporator coil is inside.

Outdoor Unit

This is the part of a split system air conditioner that sits outside your home. It contains the compressor and condenser, which cool the air and pump it into your home.

Indoor Unit

This is the part of a split system air conditioner that sits inside your home. It contains the evaporator coil, which pulls heat out of the air and pumps it outside.

Multi split system

A multi split system is a little different from a standard split system. It consists of multiple indoor units connected to one outdoor unit by refrigerant lines. This type of air conditioning system requires less space and can be used in homes without existing ductwork or central HVAC systems.

Ducted system

A ducted system is the most common type of central air conditioning unit. It consists of one outdoor compressor/condenser and multiple indoor wall units with supply registers that distribute cooled air throughout your home. Ducted systems are best for homes without existing ductwork or window units. Also, some homeowners may want to choose a ducted system because it’s more efficient than other cooling types.

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Air filter

An air filter is an important part of any central cooling system. It filters out dust, pollen, and other contaminants from the cooled air before it reaches your home.

Air purifier

An air purifier is another important part of any central cooling system. It filters out chemicals, gases, and other contaminants from the cooled air before it reaches your home.

Thermostat

A thermostat is an important part of any central cooling system. It controls the temperature and flow of cooled air throughout your home.

Heat pump

A heat pump refers to a type of air conditioner that can also provide heating in the winter months, making it more efficient than other systems (and reducing your energy bill). Some homeowners may want to choose a heat pump because it can provide year-round comfort.

Condenser Coil

A condenser coil is part of an outdoor unit. It contains refrigerant that attracts heat from your home and releases it outside, creating cool air inside.

Damper

A damper is a valve that regulates the flow of cooled air throughout your home. It’s usually found in the supply registers and allows you to adjust the amount of cool air coming into each room.

Ductwork

Ductwork is the distribution system for your central cooling system. It allows cooled air to flow throughout your home and in turn, keeps you comfortable.

Humidifier

A humidifier is an important part of any central cooling system. It helps to regulate the humidity level in your home, which can improve your comfort and health.

Ventilator

This is the part of a ducted air conditioner that pulls in fresh outside air and distributes it throughout your home. By doing so, it helps to keep your home’s air quality high.

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Refrigerant

This is the fluid that runs through a split system and helps to cool the air. It’s important to note that refrigerant is a greenhouse gas and can contribute to climate change if not properly handled.

Composite Fan Blades

Composite fan blades are made of materials like fiberglass and plastic, which makes them more durable than traditional metal fan blades. They’re also quieter and less likely to corrode over time.

Conclusion

These are just a few of the important terms you need to know when it comes to air conditioning. By understanding these terms, you’ll be able to make more informed decisions about your home cooling system. For more information, please consult a qualified aircon technician.